6 Comments

  1. Oh my word. This could have been written about what we are talking about around here when you are the “only one” you know that doesn’t have technology. (With tears as well). Hugs to you for handling it so well. So wrestling with this here as well. N1 has read the first AofGG book, but I don’t think has moved on, but I’ve been pondering that this is the summer to sit with the girls and watch the first movie for sure with them. (And you are a better mama because you shared your AofGG series with her – I didn’t! ; ) It’s SO old and falling apart, we bought her her own set last year for birthday). I think you nailed it when you said you want her to become her BEST SELF and not a copy of what everyone else looks like. Love that and I’ll be sharing this post with my girl.

    PS. re: the Incorrigibles. Have you read book 5?! Such a cliffhanger!! This one and the newest Penderwicks just upped the on-the-edge-of-my-seat factor in both of these books in series, which I think is fantastic given that it was books 4 and 5, respectively and that’s when I seem to want to lose steam with a series. So good!

  2. Anne is much adored here. I agree with you on the “moral imagination”. My children and I have had great discussions and learned much throughout our years of reading. There is something so sweet about sharing a fictional friend with our daughters.

    And..I just mentioned to my eleven year old that the latest Incorrigible book is in transit. I see a trip to the library in the next day or two.

  3. I didn’t discover Anne until I was 13, boy when I did it was revolutionary for me.

    I was in a book store years ago and a woman was so proud of the fact that her 5 year old was such a good reader and had read Anne of Green Gables already. I remember walking away thing how sad it was for that little girl since I know she probably didn’t get very much out of the story except bragging rights. It made me realize that there is a time and a place for certain books no matter what a child’s reading ability is.

    The thing I love about Anne is that I have re-read them over and over throughout the years I always get something new out of them and relate to them in different ways as I went from a teen to a young woman to a married woman and then to a mom.

  4. It’s hard and it’s not just electronics but so much is pushed onto younger and younger children. I think you showed a lot of wisdom.

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